Author Topic: FEMA  (Read 13 times)

Michael Caswell

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FEMA
« on: June 17, 2018, 06:53:21 am »
https://www.fema.gov/public-safety-around-dams

The nature of public interaction with dams is changing and guidance is needed to increase public safety around dams. Public interaction with dams is increasing for several reasons, including lack of awareness of hazards, public interest in “extreme” sports, recreational vehicles improving access, a perceived right of public access to sites, and the remote operation of dams. Dam owners need to consider how the public interacts with and around their dam, and establish appropriate procedures, restrictions, and safety measures.

Manuals and articles on dam safety.
https://www.fema.gov/technical-manuals-and-guides

A phenomenal explanation of why dams fail by Dr Ralph Peck
Part 1
https://youtu.be/ZMHUoEdbgkA

Part 2
https://youtu.be/AhpMyq4ZV2k
« Last Edit: June 17, 2018, 01:47:56 pm by Michael Caswell »

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Michael Caswell

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Re: FEMA Animals and Dams
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2018, 10:05:50 am »
FEMA Animals and dams
http://damsafety.org/sites/default/files/files/FEMA%20TM%20AnimalImpacts%20473_05.pdf

This paper summarizes Reclamation’s embankment dam design and construction history.

The last 100 years have seen the design and construction of embankment dams develop from the relatively simple homogeneous or two-zone earthfill embankments designed in 1904 or 1905 into the extremely complex, highly analyzed, well-instrumented zoned earthfill and/or rockfill structures that are the embankment dams of the new millennium.

This embankment dam engineering evolution has also involved the growth of several related disciplines, including engineering geology, seismology, hydrology, hydraulic engineering, instrumentation engineering, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering. A central component of the evolution of the engineering of embankment dams has been the birth and maturation of geotechnical engineering as a civil engineering specialty.

The use of computers and computer programs for the analysis and design of embankment dams became standard practice within a fairly short time after they were developed by geotechnical engineers. Another component of this evolution has been the development of larger, faster, more powerful, and more efficient earthwork construction equipment.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2018, 10:08:02 am by Michael Caswell »