Author Topic: NYDEC New York Dept of Conservation. Dam Classifications  (Read 10 times)

Michael Caswell

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https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/water_pdf/togs315.pdf

DOW TOGS 3.1.5 GUIDANCE FOR DAM HAZARD CLASSIFICATION
New York State uses a dam downstream hazard classification system similar to that of many states and federal agencies.  The following three classification levels are used in New York. They are listed in order of increasingly adverse consequences from a dam failure. 
These classification levels build on each other, with the higher levels adding to the consequences of the lower levels.  These downstream hazard classifications are defined in 6 NYCRR Subpart 673.5(b), and are repeated here for reference.
 
(1) Class "A" or "Low Hazard" dam: A dam failure is unlikely to result in damage to anything more than isolated or unoccupied buildings, undeveloped lands, minor roads such as town or county roads; is unlikely to result in the interruption of important utilities, including water supply, sewage treatment, fuel, power, cable or telephone infrastructure; and/or is otherwise unlikely to pose the threat of personal injury, substantial economic loss or substantial environmental damage.

(2) Class "B" or "Intermediate Hazard" dam: A dam failure may result in damage to isolated homes, main highways, and minor railroads; may result in the interruption of important utilities, including water supply, sewage treatment, fuel, power, cable or
telephone infrastructure; and/or is otherwise likely to pose the threat of personal injury and/or substantial economic loss or substantial environmental damage.  Loss of human life is not expected.

(3) Class "C" or "High Hazard" dam: A dam failure may result in widespread or serious damage to home(s); damage to main highways, industrial or commercial buildings, railroads, and/or important utilities, including water supply, sewage treatment, fuel, power, cable or telephone infrastructure; or substantial environmental damage; such that the loss of human life or widespread substantial economic loss is likely.